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Street Trees

Urban forestry is the care and management of our tree population in urban settings, including Street Trees, which adds to and improves our urban environment.

The City of North Vancouver enjoys a diversity of urban forest with a mosaic of unique settings, from trees in private yards, lining our streets, shading streams and creeks, and beautifying our parks and natural areas, to giants in our forested ravines.

The City tree population is a critical part of the urban infrastructure. Each tree is part of an urban canopy that helps absorb carbon dioxide, pulls particulate matter from the air, prevents floods by filtering rain water, and reduces the urban heat island effect by shading to keep temperatures at liveable levels. They also attract wildlife, and provide other aesthetic, social, and economic benefits.

You can spot the new trees by their green bags. The bags slowly release water to help the tree get established. Although the City fills the bags, if you see a bag looking empty, feel free to top it up with water.

  • Trees on City Property - Street trees are City owned trees planted between the curb and your property line.
  • Trees on Private Property - The City does not regulate trees on private property unless they are in a riparian zone.
  • Vandalism & Car Accidents Involving Trees - We repair or replace City trees that have been vandalized, cut down or damaged due to car accidents. We recover damages to pay for repairs or replacements. Replacement costs for mature trees can be up to $20,000.
  • Request for City Tree Maintenance - If a City tree needs attention please contact the Engineering, Parks and Environment at 604-983-7333 or complete the online service request form.

Aphid Infestation and Control

What are Aphids?
Aphids are small soft-bodied insects that feed on plants. They secrete a sugary substance called honeydew. This drips from leaves and ‘black sooty mold’ can form. This can be washed away and doesn’t harm plants or trees.

Aphids are affected by weather. Rain prevents winged aphids from dispersing, and knocks aphids off plants. Hot, dry weather increases the ability for aphids to reproduce and make new colonies.

Aphid Management
The City of North Vancouver has a targeted maintenance practice to control aphid infestations through the release of beneficial predatory insects.

The Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach has been very effective in controlling out breaks of aphids and complies with the City’s Cosmetic Pesticide Control Bylaw, 2009, No. 8041.

Early in the summer vials containing aphid predatory midge (Aa) pupae in a vermiculite medium are installed on targeted trees. There is usually a time lag between one and three weeks before predator populations catch up with the aphid populations.

What you can do to reduce aphid populations
Use a hard jet of water to dislodge aphids, ensuring to spray under the leaves and into the middle of the canopy. This should be done either in the morning or late evening, so leaves remain dry during the day.

Apply a sticky band (such as Tanglefoot or Stik-Em) around tree trunks to restrict ant movement (ants protect aphids and aphids provide ants with food). Place a protective band underneath the barrier first. Prune any branches touching the ground, buildings, or other plants.

High nitrogen levels favour aphid reproduction. Too much fertilizer promotes succulent new growth that attracts aphids. Avoid over-fertilization and use slow-release rather than highly soluble fertilizers.

Finally, preserve and encourage the presence of natural aphid predators such as birds, spiders, ladybugs, lacewing, hover fly larvae and parasitic wasps.

Tree Topping: The Truth

What is Topping?
Tree topping, also known as pollarding, stubbing, dehorning, rounding over, or heading; is the cutting and removal of healthy tree branches to reduce height.

It’s not a viable method of height reduction, does not reduce the ‘risk’ associated with tree size, and may actually increase risk due to decay and rapid regrowth.

Decay
When pruned properly, trees have the ability to heal. When topped, trees suffer from multiple large wounds and are often unable to prevent fungi from entering them. This can severely weaken or kill
the tree.

Rapid Regrowth & Hazards
Topping is thought to reduce height. However, to survive, trees produce numerous shoots below each topping cut. These shoots grow rapidly and can grow up to 20 feet in one year. Topped trees will
grow back rapidly until they reach their original size, usually within two years.

Although the regrowth is quick, the new shoots are weaker and do not have the structural integrity of the original branches. This means they are prone to break and are particularly vulnerable during wind storms.

The ‘Ugly Factor’
Trees grow into beautiful, natural shapes, providing habitats for animals and birds. When topped, trees look like ugly stubs. New shoots grow straight up giving the tree an unnatural form. Topped
trees never regain their natural grace and beauty.

Expensive
Topping results in high-maintenance pruning in subsequent years to deal with the rapid regrowth and storm damage. If topping is truly successful, the tree will die and this will require additional
funds to remove the tree.

There’s another hidden cost associated with topping: curb appeal. Healthy, well-maintained trees can add 10 to 20 percent to the value of your property. Disfigured, topped trees are considered an
impending expense.

Best Alternative
Consult and hire a professional arborist. They can determine the type of pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance and safety of your trees.

Role of Street Trees

The City tree population is a critical part of the urban infrastructure. Each tree is part of an urban canopy that helps absorb carbon dioxide, pulls particulate matter from the air, prevents floods by filtering rain water, and reduces the urban heat island effect by shading to keep temperatures at liveable levels. They also attract wildlife, and provide other aesthetic, social, and economic benefits.

New Trees

You can spot the new trees by their green bags. The bags slowly release water to help the tree get established. Although the City fills the bags, if you see a bag looking empty, feel free to top it up with water.

FAQ

  • Trees on City Property - Street trees are City owned trees planted between the curb and your property line.
  • Trees on Private Property - The City does not regulate trees on private property unless they are in a riparian zone.
  • Vandalism & Car Accidents Involving Trees - We repair or replace City trees that have been vandalized, cut down or damaged due to car accidents. We recover damages to pay for repairs or replacements. Replacement costs for mature trees can be up to $20,000.
  • Request for City Tree Maintenance - If a City tree needs attention please contact the Engineering, Parks and Environment at 604-983-7333 or complete the online service request form.

Aphids

Aphid Infestation and Control

What are Aphids?
Aphids are small soft-bodied insects that feed on plants. They secrete a sugary substance called honeydew. This drips from leaves and ‘black sooty mold’ can form. This can be washed away and doesn’t harm plants or trees.

Aphids are affected by weather. Rain prevents winged aphids from dispersing, and knocks aphids off plants. Hot, dry weather increases the ability for aphids to reproduce and make new colonies.

Aphid Management
The City of North Vancouver has a targeted maintenance practice to control aphid infestations through the release of beneficial predatory insects.

The Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach has been very effective in controlling out breaks of aphids and complies with the City’s Cosmetic Pesticide Control Bylaw, 2009, No. 8041.

Early in the summer vials containing aphid predatory midge (Aa) pupae in a vermiculite medium are installed on targeted trees. There is usually a time lag between one and three weeks before predator populations catch up with the aphid populations.

What you can do to reduce aphid populations
Use a hard jet of water to dislodge aphids, ensuring to spray under the leaves and into the middle of the canopy. This should be done either in the morning or late evening, so leaves remain dry during the day.

Apply a sticky band (such as Tanglefoot or Stik-Em) around tree trunks to restrict ant movement (ants protect aphids and aphids provide ants with food). Place a protective band underneath the barrier first. Prune any branches touching the ground, buildings, or other plants.

High nitrogen levels favour aphid reproduction. Too much fertilizer promotes succulent new growth that attracts aphids. Avoid over-fertilization and use slow-release rather than highly soluble fertilizers.

Finally, preserve and encourage the presence of natural aphid predators such as birds, spiders, ladybugs, lacewing, hover fly larvae and parasitic wasps.

Topping

Tree Topping: The Truth

What is Topping?
Tree topping, also known as pollarding, stubbing, dehorning, rounding over, or heading; is the cutting and removal of healthy tree branches to reduce height.

It’s not a viable method of height reduction, does not reduce the ‘risk’ associated with tree size, and may actually increase risk due to decay and rapid regrowth.

Decay
When pruned properly, trees have the ability to heal. When topped, trees suffer from multiple large wounds and are often unable to prevent fungi from entering them. This can severely weaken or kill
the tree.

Rapid Regrowth & Hazards
Topping is thought to reduce height. However, to survive, trees produce numerous shoots below each topping cut. These shoots grow rapidly and can grow up to 20 feet in one year. Topped trees will
grow back rapidly until they reach their original size, usually within two years.

Although the regrowth is quick, the new shoots are weaker and do not have the structural integrity of the original branches. This means they are prone to break and are particularly vulnerable during wind storms.

The ‘Ugly Factor’
Trees grow into beautiful, natural shapes, providing habitats for animals and birds. When topped, trees look like ugly stubs. New shoots grow straight up giving the tree an unnatural form. Topped
trees never regain their natural grace and beauty.

Expensive
Topping results in high-maintenance pruning in subsequent years to deal with the rapid regrowth and storm damage. If topping is truly successful, the tree will die and this will require additional
funds to remove the tree.

There’s another hidden cost associated with topping: curb appeal. Healthy, well-maintained trees can add 10 to 20 percent to the value of your property. Disfigured, topped trees are considered an
impending expense.

Best Alternative
Consult and hire a professional arborist. They can determine the type of pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance and safety of your trees.

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