Land Use

Land distribution and density can determine where people live, work, shop and play. When the City examines previous patterns of land use, we see how important convenience is. The City can encourage the careful development and design of energy efficient buildings, but if these buildings are not situated close to businesses, services, transportation, recreation and green spaces, people do not have reason to support the area. This can create inequalities in our communities and magnify environmental, economic and social problems. Lower density leads to fewer transportation options, resulting in more people using their cars. This, in turn, contributes to the growing problem of greenhouse gas and climate change.

Land Use Plan

The City's Land Use Plan continues the work initially begun by its pioneering leaders. Established in the first Official Community Plan in 1980, the Land Use Plan provides a sort of anatomy of the City. At its heart is the Lonsdale Regional Town Centre with Lonsdale Avenue serving as the City's vital "spine". It connects the waterfront at the foot of Lonsdale with the Trans Canada Highway intersecting at the top of Lonsdale.

High density development and major institutions such as schools, churches and emergency services are concentrated along this designated Town Centre, which includes
 
Lower and Central Lonsdale. Single family neighbourhoods surround the Town Centre, while most of the City's largest parks are located along stream routes in those neighbourhoods. Environmentally sensitive areas tend to follow those stream corridors.

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